Does ELA Divide Families?

The “enhanced commonwealth” idea has been completely debunked by now. The Department of Justice warned Puerto Rico not to deceive voters into thinking that Free Association is a version of “enhanced commonwealth” and insisted that it be made clear that the status quo is a territorial relationship.

The Supreme Court confirmed last year that Puerto Rico’s current position is that of a territory — a “mere territory” as the governor at the time put it.

Enhanced commonwealth is a fantasy. The U.S. has refused it over and over. Click To Tweet

But the “commonwealth” party won’t give up the myth. Knowing that they cannot win the vote on June 11, they’re promoting a boycott of the plebiscite.

Statehood supporters have responded with a video ad pointing out the consequences of clutching the idea of “enhanced commonwealth” in the face of so much evidence that it is a myth.

Puerto Rico’s economic position is worse than that of any of the 50 states. Healthcare, education, and the daily quality of life are endangered by resistance to change.

One action that many Puerto Ricans are taking is to leave Puerto Rico. There are now far more Puerto Ricans living in the States than on the Island. Families are being divided. If Puerto Rico remains a territory, her people will continue to flock to the States. Many feel that they have no choice.

If Puerto Rico becomes an independent nation, with or without Free Association, her people will probably not continue to be U.S. citizens. Certainly, people born in the Republic of Puerto Rico will not be the citizens of the United States. They may or may not be able to travel freely in the United States. It depends on how the agreement between the U.S. and Puerto Rico is negotiated.

When Puerto Rico is a state, families will be able to travel from Florida to Puerto Rico, from Puerto Rico to New York, just as all Americans can travel freely from one state to another. Statehood will mean a guarantee of U.S. citizenship and the same freedom to travel that we have now.

If you live in Puerto Rico, be sure to vote on June 11. Don’t leave the decision in someone else’s hands.

If you live in the states, be sure to tell your congressional representatives that you care about Puerto Rico and want action on Puerto Rico statehood.

One Comment

Albert

Greetings, It is a shame that my family and I were forced to leave the island after 37 years living and significantly contributing to the islands growth and prosperity. I was not born there but it was the place of birth of my wife and my parents which we called home. Our hearts were torn when we were forced to go to the mainland to ensure the livelihood and my children’s educational goals. Don’t get me wrong I am a proud American and we are honored to live in the mainland. However, we feel that after all our efforts living in our beloved island, we have no say in PR future to become the 51st State of the Union especially when many of us had to leave. This tug of war between commonwealth and statehood left the island in a constant state of uncertainty which caused much kaos and confusion (the inability of our politicians only thinking about themselves and allowing for IRS section code 936 to be dismantled without having an planned alternative; pushing out the Navy because of an accident in Vieques; this in turn affected the Army’s 7th Command to leave the island!! Countless jobs lost due the Commonwealth status!! Worse we let the politicians and bankers steal the very rug from our feet placing the future of PR generations in debt!! This is what those who favor Commonwealth wanted: no intervention from Congress except to beg monies for them to put into their pockets!! All those fellow puertorriqueños who died in wars starting from World War I would turn in their graves ashamed of what we have done to PR. I pray to the God almighty that those that do remain PR make the wise choice of not only going to vote on the 12th of June but also overwhelming vote for the statehood! May God bless us all.

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